Monday, February 24, 2014

Palm Blast

Something taken from Wing Chun and used in JKD is a "Straight Blast," AKA Chain Punching, Battle Punch. Essentially, one strike is coming straight down your centerline to the opponent and as it withdraws in a slightly curving motion downward, the other punch is coming forward to replace it. Think of an uppercase "D" laying on its back. It may look cartoonish, but it can be very effective. In WC, it is often used to enter, but Bruce Lee found it could be too easily evaded as an entry and it came to to the following generations as a good follow-up.

In JKD and Wing Chun, hand conditioning is part of the training. Years ago when I noticed scarring on Dan Inosanto's fore knuckles I assumed that it was from conditioning that he did for Kali empty hands where he would use those knuckles to attack incoming limbs, but when I asked him about it, he told me "No, Bruce made me condition those knuckles for the chop chuie strike to the low ribs." Hard core. 

But many/most people do condition their hands, and in that case I think doing a straight blast with palms is a good alternative as you don't have to be as concerned about what surface you are hitting: if he starts to turn away, palm blasting the side or back of the head will still feel comfortable to and unconditioned hand.

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Gloating

A while back I came across a review of my Filipino Kali Empty Hand DVD series that was from a few years ago. Now, I don't mind if people disagree with me, and I don't mind if people don't think I look like a tough guy, but what is annoying is when someone is critical without actually having listened to what I said. One of the things the reviewer in question said is that the knee shield destruction/defense against a low round kick I presented "... is a good way to get your knee broken." See "Drill Post #16: One More Destruction for details about this shield.

Anyhow, as many people have seen in the fight between Anderson Silva and Chris Wiedman, it works REALLY WELL (completely shattered Silva's shin in a most disgusting way) and Wiedman didn't even have his knee placed on Silva's instep but rather his shin AND Wiedman clearly suffered not at all for the crash.

Not that this incident would likely change the mind of the dimwit reviewer, after all, some people are absolutely devoted to their stupidity.

Friday, January 3, 2014

Can't Get Enough of that Phantom Cam.

As I have harped about since forever, human combative instincts are not pretty! The great tendency is towards dropping the freehand when striking and messy form in general. To support that easy contention, check out the Phantom Cam UFC footage. The defensive lesson is to work on keeping good defensive form while attacking, and the offensive lesson is that sectoring/time-hitting during someone's attack is more often available than not. See my Drill Post #13 and Time-hitting posts for more perspective on this.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Street-Tweaked Boxing

Street-Tweaked Boxing is now in DVD format, huzzah! At the moment it is only available as an MPEG4, so it is fine on a computer, but not a standard DVD player. See instructional DVD section for ordering.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Curriculum and the Individual

Curriculum is often a double-edged thing. It is a way to have a logical organization of material, but too often it's just a regurgitation of tradition, and a way of justifying having blinders on. I may have a general progression that I use, but it's always adjusted to the individual. It's clear that each person has different learning capabilities and predilections that need to be addressed. To fine-tune training to a particular student's abilities, physical and cognitive, is a challenge (usually enjoyable). The important goal for me is to feel that the student owns the material rather than having memorized a curriculum, and indeed, none of my students have been "curriculum junkies," or concerned with rank (which I don't generally bother with). I'm glad the concern has been, as the saying in JKD goes, "It's not what you know, but what you can do."

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Available Weapons


We have talked about "available," i.e. improvised weapons before. Since I go to deserted and not particularly welcoming places as part of my ongoing documentation of graffiti, I keep my eyes open for              such objects even if I carry a knife. Here's one I came across while walking down the rail tracks in Watts. It would be great even without the spike.

Friday, February 8, 2013

Time Hitting

"Time Hitting" is the western fencing term for simultaneous defense and attack, what in (at least one transliteration) Wing Chun is referred to as "lin sil die dar." My "Sectoring" DVD is about that subject, particularly against jabs and crosses.

The reason that developing the ability to time hit is so valuable, is that attackers rarely think of defending during their attack. Human combative instinct is not that efficient. Rather, the commonality is all defense, all attack, all defense until one sees an opening after an attack has failed, or two knuckleheads just trying to out-punch each other. The example I like to point out is that even world class boxers drop their non-punching hand when punching, and they more than anyone else are supposed to be trained to keep their hands up. I would recommend getting a video of a world class match and watching the exchanges in slow motion to see how many time-hit opportunities are presented.

Yes, I certainly acknowledge that when it's coming fast and hard that it's not a done deal, but the opportunities are there and worth training to look for and catch.